Mission & History

The need for soil conservation has been recognized for centuries. Although not widely practiced in Colonial America, many farmers, including Thomas Jefferson, realized the importance of protecting topsoil. After the Dust Bowl in the 1930s and witnessing the devastating results of erosion, the U.S. Government created soil conservation districts. A political subdivision of state government, districts typically have the same boundaries as their county. Soil conservation districts provide farmers, developers and the general public with soil and water conservation expertise at the local level. The Prince George’s Soil Conservation District was established on April 7, 1941. Initially created to assist the farming community in saving valuable topsoil, the District has expanded its programs to include water quality protection, public education, urban erosion and sediment control, small pond approval, and technical assistance to urban agricultural producers, landowners, schools, federal, state and local agencies and other groups.

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The mission of the Prince George’s Soil Conservation District is to protect and promote the health, safety and general welfare of the citizens of the State and County, and otherwise enhance their living environment by conservation of soil, water and related resources. The District works to control and prevent soil erosion in order to preserve natural resources, control floods, prevent impairment of dams and reservoirs, assist in maintaining the navigability of rivers and harbors, preserve wildlife, protect the tax base and public lands.

The District promotes sound land management through the development and implementation of locally-led soil conservation and water quality programs.